Blog / Tag / "art"

Risky Business: Inside Look at how Performing Arts directors choose what you see

Risky Business: Inside Look at how Performing Arts directors choose what you see

If you've ever wanted to know the kind of vision that goes into developing a festival or a performing arts season--now is the time for you to find out?  How DO these few people decide WHICH shows will sell in the Yukon?  What helps make their decisions?  Do they hand out surveys asking YOU questions?  Or do they have an insight to Whitehorse patrons that we don't know?  Is it a Crystal Ball?  Or is it a lot of planning and  designing that goes into making these decisions?

When putting together a major festival like Frostbite, or ALFF, or Pivot---is it just a combination of artist availability and price? 

How would you decide which music acts might be popular in the Yukon? 

Is Taste shared?

Can one person KNOW what YOU might like? 

Well, someone has to make those choices in organizations.  You have to have someone(s) in every performing arts organization that makes the kind of fortune-telling guesses that create a successful season.  How do they do it?  What are they thinking about when they decide?  Are they trying to mold your preferences, or are they molded BY your preferences? 

Get inside the minds of four Artistic Directors from Nakai, Yukon Arts Centre, Frostbite, Yukon Film Society and Gwaandak Theatre (yes, four people, five organizations).  Find out how they make choices. Remember, all five are non-profit organizations that exist on grants as well as on ticket sales, aiming to please granting agencies, boards as well as patrons. 

Maybe you'd like to be an Artistic Director someday.  Maybe you just want to know who's to credit for bringing in a show you LOVED (or why they brought one you HATED).  Maybe you just want to know WHAT THEY'RE THINKING.

The Mind of the Artistic Director.  It is a fascinating place.  Starring Eric Epstein, David Skelton, Patti Flather and Andy Connors--moderated by Miche Genest.

For this panel discussion, the Artistic Directors may reveal their tips, their tricks, their thoughts, their fears, their best and worst moments, and how complicated it all is choosing what comes to the Yukon.

Come join us!  Bring questions!  Find out HOW IT ALL WORKS (or doesn't).... WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 5:30pm, OLD FIRE HALL.

We Look For Fire

We Look For Fire

 

We are compelled to gather around fires.  Ever since the dawn of mankind, people have been gathering wherever they see a fire—it signified community, food, warmth, survival.  In the wilderness, a fire was the difference between life and death.  But it was also a place where we shared our community, our culture—and shared stories that lit our imaginations. 

We are compelled to gather in the dark around these fires.  Going to the theatre has become a way for us to sit back in the dark, anonymous, not on stage, but still receive something personal and intimate from the lights and the performance, still feel the community in the flickering stage lights.  It’s primal, this gathering—and we will do it in high school gymnasiums, in living rooms, at bonfires, at summer camps, at bars—and yes, when we kindle the desire to create a permanent space for the Arts, we gather there—in those halls, galleries, black boxes, stages and cinemas. 

And there, we still look for fire. 

We look for something to inspire us.   To make us excited.  To make us smile.  Or cringe, or jump, or dance, or remember, or change.  We look for a mirror and we look for a portal and we look to travel there and back again.  What happens on a stage transforms us because it’s in our cultural and historical DNA---we are ready to receive story, ready to recognize ourselves, ready to meet new ideas, ready to open our hearts to change, ready to rally in support of a future we couldn’t imagine as perfectly as when someone, lit by fire, tells us about their visions of what could be.  Or sings of what they feel.  Or dances what they’ve discovered.  Or paints what they have dreamed.

The Arts are a bonfire of remembrance and reckoning and resurrection, celebration and community, and by that heat and light we survive.  We pass down to the next generation all that is important in our culture when we gather around these fires, wherever they are. 

We invite you to celebrate our fireplace.  The Yukon Arts Centre was created 20 years ago.  Come hear the story again for the first time…first in these blogposts, and then on our special March 23rd 20th Anniversary show. 

Come share our fire with us.  It was always yours to begin with.
________

 

(photo by Tristan Schmurr)

Jay White, Chilkoot Trail Artist in Residence coming to OFH

Jay White, Chilkoot Trail Artist in Residence coming to OFH

This is going to be great!  Animator, Jay White, went over the Chilkoot Trail as part of the Chilkoot Trail Artist-in-Residence!  He just got back!!
Check out his Talk about his experience, and some AWESOME art, at the Old Fire Hall, 5pm, THURS, Aug 16.  Should be a great time!

Jay White likes to bring his imagination
to life through oil and watercolour paintings, animated
short films, and through interdisciplinary collaboration
with other artists.

His current animated short film, The Perfect Detonator,
premiered at the St. Louis International Film Festival, and
is now showing in festivals across the world.

THE CHILKOOT TRAIL ARTIST-in-RESIDENCE is a collaborative creation from Parks Canada, the US National Park Service, the Skagway Arts Council, and the Yukon Arts Centre!

Two countries,
two arts groups,
two park services,
two artists

---one big, long, exhausting, beautiful trail between them!

DC-3 Yarn Bomb Sewing Bee

DC-3 Yarn Bomb Sewing Bee

The Yarn Bomb Yukon Collective and a wonederful crew of local volunteers have been busy sewing together the yarn bomb for the DC-3.  You're invited to help sew a little or a lot or just stop by to see how the project is going. 

To learn more about the project, please check out Yarn Bomb Yukon's blog, twitter and facebook for all the updates.

 

Introducing Lusia, Summer Gallery Intern

Introducing Lusia, Summer Gallery Intern

Lusia Stetkiewicz is a born and raised Yukoner. Growing up around such natural beauty inspired her art from a young age, and art has always been a large part of her life. She will enter her second year at the Alberta College of Art and Design in September, working towards a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Working as the Gallery Intern at The Yukon Arts Center Public Gallery is nothing short of a dream job for an aspiring artist, she says, and she's looking forward to working with the team here on many artistic and cultural movements and workshops throughout the summer.

We look forward to a summer filled with Art and Colour.  She's already helped us put up our latest Art Gallery explosion of colour. 

Check out our three shows:  Nunavut's Culture on Cloth by the Women of Baker Lake, Nunavut; They Call us Squatters by Alison McCreesh, and Look At All the Things We've Found by Meghan Hildebrand--now up till August 25! 

She had a hand in putting them together! 

This position is funded by Young Canada Works and Canadian Museums Association